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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

12 edition of The syntax of anaphora found in the catalog.

The syntax of anaphora

by Kenneth J. Safir

  • 57 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Anaphora (Linguistics),
  • Grammar, Comparative and general -- Syntax

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 285-299) and indexes.

    StatementKen Safir.
    SeriesOxford studies in comparative syntax
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsP299.A5 S24 2004
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 313 p. ;
    Number of Pages313
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3682974M
    ISBN 100195166132, 0195166140
    LC Control Number2003042007

    In linguistics, anaphora (/ ə ˈ n æ f ər ə /) is the use of an expression whose interpretation depends upon another expression in context (its antecedent or postcedent). In a narrower sense, anaphora is the use of an expression that depends specifically upon an antecedent expression and thus is contrasted with cataphora, which is the use of an expression that depends upon a postcedent. Example of Anaphora. Some of the most enduring poetry makes use of anaphora. One of the great protest poems of the Cold War era, 'America' by Allen Ginsberg, addresses his native country in the.

    Its theoretical and empirical investigation of the notions of anaphora and of binding in syntax should define the direction of research in this field for the next Chomsky's Government-Binding (G-B) framework the relationship between an anaphoric expression and its antecedent is constrained by certain binding principles. Anaphora: A Reference Guide is a collection of essays that report on the major results of recent research in anaphora and set the stage for further inquiry.. Reports on the major results of recent research in anaphora and sets the stage for further inquiry. Features contributions from among the world's leading researchers on anaphora.

    Syntax is the arrangement of words into a sentence that make sense in a given language. Syntax also refers to the rules and principles that govern sentence structure in a language, i.e., how words and phrases may be joined. Syntax therefore is not a strictly literary device, but instead is part of every utterance and written line, and even the Missing: anaphora. Anaphora is a type of parallel structure that is particularly effective in speeches because of its rhythmic quality. Anaphora offers the additional benefit of making points more easily remembered.


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The syntax of anaphora by Kenneth J. Safir Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book Description Anaphora is a key issue for linguists. Yan Huang questions the Government and Binding approach to anaphora and develops a pragmatic theory within the neo-Gricean framework of conversational implicature.

He demonstrates that syntax and pragmatics are interconnected in determining anaphoric by: Free 2-day shipping. Buy The Syntax of Anaphora (Paperback) at In this work, Ken Safir develops a comprehensive theory on the role of anaphora in syntax. First, he contends that the complementary distribution of forms that support the anaphoric readings is not accidental, contrary to most current thinking, but rather should be derived from a principle, one that he proposes in the form of an algorithm.

Secondly, he maintains that dependent identity. The Syntax of Anaphora Article (PDF Available)   January   with  1, Reads  How we measure 'reads' A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, Author: Ken Safir.

In this work, Ken Safir develops a comprehensive theory on the role of anaphora in syntax. First, he contends that the complementary distribution of forms that support the anaphoric readings is not accidental, contrary to most current thinking, but rather should be derived from a principle, one that he proposes in the form of an algorithm.

Develops a theory about the role of anaphora in the formulation of general syntax. This monograph shows that the complementary distribution of forms that support anaphoric readings is not accidental.

It also shows that anaphora-specific principles are universal, and that the patterns of anaphora across languages arise from lexical properties. This book develops a pragmatic theory of anaphora within the neo-Gricean framework of conversational implicature.

Chomsky claims that anaphora reflects underlying principles of innate Universal Grammar, and the view is widely held that only syntactic and semantic factors are crucial to intrasentential anaphora. The Syntax and Pragmatics of Anaphora by Yan Huang,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

The Syntax and Pragmatics of Anaphora: Yan Huang: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. Anaphora and epiphora (also known as epistrophe) are related concepts in that they both are techniques involving repetition.

While the definition of anaphora is that the repetition comes at the beginning of adjacent clauses, repetition in epiphora comes at the end of clauses. If these two devices are used together, the effect is called symploce.

In writing or speech, the deliberate repetition of the first part of the sentence in order to achieve an artistic effect is known as Anaphora. Anaphora, possibly the oldest literary device, has its roots in Biblical Psalms used to emphasize certain words or phrases. Gradually, Elizabethan and Romantic writers brought this device into practice.

Anaphora is defined by Merriam Webster as the repetition of a word or phrase or expression at the beginning of phrases, clauses, sentences, or verses successively with the main purpose of having a rhetorical or poetic effect.

You may also see exclamatory sentences. When writers and speakers make use of anaphora. In the early chapters Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, one example of anaphora can be found in Scout's early description of Calpurnia, the Finches' cook: Calpurnia was something else again. Books; The Syntax and Pragmatics of Anaphora; Empty categories; The Syntax and Pragmatics of Anaphora.

The Syntax and Pragmatics of Anaphora A Study with Special Reference to Chinese Chinese is well known to be a language with widespread zero anaphora (ChaoLü[], Wang [], Gao []). Following Ross ( Anaphora is a rhetorical device that emphasizes a phrase through repetition. The opening lines of "A Tale of Two Cities" is an example of anaphora--"it was the best of times, it was the worst of.

The Syntax of Anaphora (Oxford Studies in Comparative Syntax) | Ken Safir | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books. Anaphora is a figure of speech in which words repeat at the beginning of successive clauses, phrases, or sentences.

For example, Martin Luther King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech contains anaphora: "So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. The most famous anaphora that we’re all probably familiar with comes from the opening lines of Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities.

You know, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times ” etc. Martin Luther King Jr. also used anaphora in his “I have a. This book establishes the need for a competitive approach to the distribution and interpretation of anaphoric relations in natural language, and makes a particular proposal about the sort of competitive theory of anaphora that might be on the right track.

Linguists are especially interested in anaphoric relations because they provide evidence for the existence of an innate human language. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Functional Syntax: Anaphora, Discourse, and by: The syntax of anaphora (review) The book under review, like its companion (Safir ), is an impressive contribution to the S’s further theoretical claim is that the syntax of anaphora.

Topics covered include binding and control, null subjects and objects, long distance reflexivisation, logophoricity, bridging-cross reference, switch-reference, and discourse n by a leading expert on anaphora, the book will be the standard point of reference for all those interested in this important topic in theoretical linguistics.In grammar, anaphora is the use of a pronoun or similar word to refer back to an earlier word or phrase.

The anaphoric term for this is an anaphor. Using an anaphor avoids repetition in conversation or text. For example: "Anthony plays football. He likes sports." The word "he" is an anaphor referring back to Anthony.

Anthony is the antecedent.Anaphora Often used in political speeches and occasionally in prose and poetry, anaphora is the repetition of a word or words at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines to create a sonic effect.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech, which uses anaphora not only in its oft-quoted “I have a dream.